Don’t take international comparisons of income inequality at face value as different data used to derive figures: Experts

While some developed countries impose higher overall taxes on the working population to finance large social transfers, Singapore's approach is to keep the tax burden light and provide targeted support for people of lower income, which could account
While some developed countries impose higher overall taxes on the working population to finance large social transfers, Singapore's approach is to keep the tax burden light and provide targeted support for people of lower income, which could account for its higher Gini figure.ST FILE PHOTO

Don't take international comparisons of income inequality at face value, they caution

Singapore's efforts to address income inequality appear to be bearing fruit, but it still lags behind several developed countries on this front.

After factoring in taxes and transfers, and adjusting for different household sizes using a method called square root scale, Singapore's Gini coefficient was 0.352 last year.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on February 22, 2020, with the headline 'Govts use different data to compute Gini figures: Experts'. Print Edition | Subscribe