Govt to carefully study whether Bicentennial Experience exhibition can be made permanent

Since the exhibition's public opening in June, free tickets each month have been snapped up within the first two weeks of release.
Since the exhibition's public opening in June, free tickets each month have been snapped up within the first two weeks of release.PHOTO: ST FILE
The exhibition's 500,000th visitor, student Tit Yee Kiat, 18 (second from right) being welcomed by (from left) Bicentennial Experience creative director Michael Chiang, Singapore Bicentennial Office executive director Gene Tan, and DPM Heng Swee Keat
The exhibition's 500,000th visitor, student Tit Yee Kiat, 18 (second from right) being welcomed by (from left) Bicentennial Experience creative director Michael Chiang, Singapore Bicentennial Office executive director Gene Tan, and DPM Heng Swee Keat.ST PHOTO: NG SOR LUAN

SINGAPORE - Many Singaporeans have called for the Bicentennial Experience to be made permanent, and this is a move that the Government will carefully study, said Deputy Prime Minister Heng Swee Keat on Sunday (Oct 6).

"We are studying this because it is not just one or two particular exhibits (that we are looking at). We want to see how we can curate this as an entire experience that can tell us the Singapore story," he said.

He was speaking on the sidelines of a visit to the Bicentennial Experience at Fort Canning, where he also welcomed the exhibition's 500,000th visitor, Tampines Meridian Junior College student Tit Yee Kiat, 18.

Though the exhibition was initially supposed to end on Sept 15, it has been extended to the end of the year in response to public feedback.

It takes visitors back in time to witness key moments in Singapore's transformation over 700 years, and is one of the main highlights of this year's bicentennial commemoration.

Mr Heng said that one of his takeaways from the Bicentennial Experience is that Singaporeans want to have a better understanding of the past.

"One important area that we are working on now is the Singapore Together movement. I will like to see how we can bring Singaporeans together to talk about our past, and what does this mean for our future? By looking back at our past, I think we can chart our future better together."

Another frequent comment that he has received from visitors is that although Singapore is a small place, the one quality that allows it to stay relevant and useful to the world is its ability to keep reinventing itself, he told reporters.

 
 

"We will have to continue to make changes as the world changes around us... This exhibition also highlights that our fate as a nation is very much linked to what happens around us, around the world."

Since the exhibition's public opening in June, free tickets each month have been snapped up within the first two weeks of release.

It was closed from Sept 16 to 30 for technical maintenance and refurbishment.