Foreign workers provide cover on a rainy day

As he alighted from the bus on the way home, financial adviser Winson Heng was expecting to be drenched in the rain.

Little did he expect a man to hold an umbrella over him, sheltering him from the rain.

Mr Heng, 27, was so touched by the gesture on Monday that he posted about his experience on Facebook that same day.

The man who sheltered him was a foreign worker, who Mr Heng believes was taking a break from work due to the heavy rain.

The unidentified worker had with him an umbrella at the bus stop opposite Block 323B Sengkang East Way at around 10am.

He was accompanied by two colleagues, who stationed themselves at the front of the bus stop to shelter commuters boarding buses, said Mr Heng.

"Initially, I thought maybe they were doing this as part of their job," he told The Straits Times yesterday.

The foreign workers, armed with an umbrella each, stationed themselves at a bus stop in Sengkang at around 10am on Monday to shelter commuters boarding and alighting from buses in the heavy rain.
The foreign workers, armed with an umbrella each, stationed themselves at a bus stop in Sengkang at around 10am on Monday to shelter commuters boarding and alighting from buses in the heavy rain. PHOTO: WINSON HENG/FACEBOOK

ACT OF KINDNESS

I guess when they were doing this they weren't expecting any rewards. They were just doing it out of the goodness of their hearts.

MR WINSON HENG, on the foreign workers who appeared embarrassed when he bought them drinks to thank them.

"But I saw other foreign workers who were sitting down and relaxing, so I realised the three men were actually not obliged to do this."

He added that he decided to stick around to observe the trio, and noticed that they would "faithfully" shelter people boarding and alighting.

"Even before the bus would stop, they would automatically go to the front and back of the bus to hold up the umbrella, which I thought was really amazing," said Mr Heng, who estimated that the workers were at it for a few hours.

To thank them for their kind gesture, he said he bought four 1.5-litre bottles of 100Plus drinks.

"They just kept saying thank you, and from their posture, I could tell that they were very 'paiseh'," he said, using the Hokkien term for being embarrassed.

"I guess when they were doing this, they weren't expecting any rewards. They were just doing it out of the goodness of their hearts."

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 31, 2018, with the headline 'Foreign workers provide cover on a rainy day'. Print Edition | Subscribe