Tough work tracking down high-rise litterbugs

Mr Halmie Hussein Mattar with a camera used to investigate a high-rise littering case. When one area becomes a consistent concern, National Environment Agency officers may scope it out for suitable vantage points to place cameras. Investigators have
Mr Halmie Hussein Mattar with a camera used to investigate a high-rise littering case. When one area becomes a consistent concern, National Environment Agency officers may scope it out for suitable vantage points to place cameras. Investigators have to seek out location opportunities in bushes, trees, rooftops and obscure corners of corridors.PHOTO: NATIONAL ENVIRONMENT AGENCY

Cases take time due to scant clues, uncooperative suspects

When tracking down the culprits behind high-rise littering, sometimes all that National Environment Agency (NEA) officers have to go on is a photograph of rubbish on the ground.

Mr Halmie Hussein Mattar, deputy head of the agency's Western Regional Office, said it is almost as if people expect him to be able to tell where the litter originated from.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 20, 2019, with the headline 'Tough work tracking down high-rise litterbugs'. Print Edition | Subscribe