Temperatures could fall to 23 deg C over last 2 weeks of November: Weatherman

Singapore can expect short thundery showers in the afternoon on seven to nine days as the north-east monsoon season hits over the next two weeks.
Singapore can expect short thundery showers in the afternoon on seven to nine days as the north-east monsoon season hits over the next two weeks.ST PHOTO: KUA CHEE SIONG

SINGAPORE - A combination of strengthening winds and changing monsoon conditions may bring temperatures down to as low as 23 deg C in Singapore in the next two weeks, the weatherman said on Friday (Nov 15).

With more rain forecast in the last two weeks of November, the weather is expected to be slightly cooler than it was at the start of the month, the National Environment Agency's Meteorological Service Singapore (MSS) said.

The daily temperature on most days is forecast to range between 24 deg C and 33 deg C over the fortnight.

However, MSS noted that there could still be one or two warm days where the warmest temperature could reach around 34 deg C, as well as cool nights where the temperature could fall to about 23 deg C.

Singapore can also expect short thundery showers in the afternoon on seven to nine days as the north-east monsoon season hits over the next two weeks.

The north-east monsoon season, which is also the rainy season over southern South-east Asia, is expected to extend into March 2020.

This contrasts with the slightly warmer temperatures that were recorded in the first fortnight of November.

MSS said that over the past two weeks, daily maximum temperatures reached above 34 deg C for more than half the days in this period, and the highest daily temperature was recorded at 34.9 deg C on Nov 7 at Marina Barrage and Ang Mo Kio.

Over this period, most parts of Singapore recorded below-average rainfall, with Sentosa recording the biggest rainfall anomaly of 96 per cent below average.

 

Yet, strengthening winds and showers helped alleviate the occasional slight haziness that shrouded Singapore.

Particularly on Wednesday, the 24-hour Pollutant Standards Index reading tipped over into the unhealthy range at 105 at 7pm, owing to the accumulation of particulate matter in the atmosphere under light wind conditions, said NEA on the same day.

The air quality went back to the moderate range on Thursday following showers and a strengthening and shifting of the winds.