Researchers use fly faeces to get insight into Singapore's biodiversity

The genetic material of the critically endangered Sunda pangolin (left) and Raffles' banded langur can be detected in fly excreta. PHOTOS: LIANHE ZAOBAO,SABRINA JABBAR
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SINGAPORE - Most people detest flies, so their faecal matter and vomit would be even more unappealing.
 
But a group of scientists have found that there is value in the waste of certain faeces and flesh-eating flies.

Researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and Berlin’s Natural History Museum in Germany have found that the genetic material of the critically endangered Sunda pangolin and Raffles’ banded langur can be detected in fly excreta.

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