More than 100 hawksbill turtle eggs hatch in Sentosa; fourth turtle hatching there since 1996

More than 100 newborn hawksbill turtles made their way into the sea at Tanjong Beach in Sentosa on Wednesday (Sept 19), after they were checked and measured by SDC officials.
More than 100 newborn hawksbill turtles made their way into the sea at Tanjong Beach in Sentosa on Wednesday (Sept 19), after they were checked and measured by SDC officials.PHOTO: SENTOSA DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
More than 100 newborn hawksbill turtles made their way into the sea at Tanjong Beach in Sentosa on Wednesday (Sept 19), after they were checked and measured by SDC officials.
More than 100 newborn hawksbill turtles made their way into the sea at Tanjong Beach in Sentosa on Wednesday (Sept 19), after they were checked and measured by SDC officials.PHOTO COURTESY OF BERNARD SEAH
A critically endangered hawksbill turtle was seen laying eggs on Sentosa's Tanjong Beach on July 21, 2018.
A critically endangered hawksbill turtle was seen laying eggs on Sentosa's Tanjong Beach on July 21, 2018.PHOTO: SENTOSA DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

SINGAPORE - More than 100 hawksbill turtle eggs hatched in Sentosa on Wednesday (Sept 19), about two months after the eggs were found.

A Sentosa Development Corporation (SDC) spokesman told The Straits Times on Thursday that 102 eggs hatched on Wednesday and the hatchlings were released into the sea on the same day. The baby turtles were checked and measured before they were released.

The nest was first discovered by Sentosa's rangers at Tanjong Beach on July 21.

SDC's spokesman said: "In line with SDC's commitment to conserving wildlife found on the island, a protective barrier was erected around the nest within the day to keep the eggs safe from natural predators such as monitor lizards and crabs, as well as other potential disturbances during the incubation period."

The spokesman added that SDC worked with the National Parks Board to conduct checks to ensure that the nest was safe.

The hawksbill turtle is listed as a critically endangered animal on the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List.

The SDC spokesman said it was the fourth time since 1996 that hawksbill turtle eggs have hatched on Sentosa. Turtle hatchings were also recorded in 2010 and in January this year at Tanjong Beach.

Visitors who spot a turtle nest on Sentosa are reminded to contact SDC via its hotline on 1800-736-8672. They should also keep a distance from any sighted turtle and not shine lights on the animal to avoid confusing or scaring it. 

 

For members of the public who want to learn more about turtles, the SDC will be organising a free talk titled Tales of the Sea Turtles at the Palawan Amphitheatre on Oct 6, between 7pm and 8pm. The talk will be conducted by Conservation International in Singapore's field programme coordinator Rushan Abdul Rahman.

Additional reporting by Jose Hong