Ground-up efforts count in push to be zero-waste

ST VIDEO: AUDREY TAN
Ms Yansary Abdullah, 34, now brings her own food containers when she goes to the Geylang Serai wet market. Previously, she would return home with about 40 plastic bags after each trip to the market. She said she could not reuse the bags as they had c
During a recent teachers’ training buffet lunch, no disposables were provided. ST PHOTOS: GAVIN FOO
Left: At Kidz Treehouse, teachers are encouraged to bring their own reusables to work, such as metal straws and water bottles. Above: During a recent teachers' training buffet lunch, no disposables were provided.
At Kidz Treehouse, teachers are encouraged to bring their own reusables to work, such as metal straws and water bottles. ST PHOTOS: GAVIN FOO

Individuals and firms are pitching in, from refusing plastic bags to straw-free policies

During each visit to the wet market, librarian Yansary Abdullah, 34, estimates she is given about 40 plastic bags, but they often end up in the bin because they held raw food. So last month, she brought her own containers to the wet market and plans to continue doing so.

"I think it is a pity to see so many bags being thrown away," she said.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 21, 2018, with the headline 'Ground-up efforts count in push to be zero-waste'. Print Edition | Subscribe