Critically endangered shovelnose ray to get better protection

Ms Sue Ye of Marine Stewards and Dr Neil Hutchinson from the local campus of James Cook University with a shovelnose ray. The marine creature and 17 other species were added to Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Specie
Ms Sue Ye of Marine Stewards and Dr Neil Hutchinson from the local campus of James Cook University with a shovelnose ray. The marine creature and 17 other species were added to Appendix II of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora.ST PHOTO: DESMOND WEE

Shovelnose ray, a species native to S'pore, makes international list controlling its trade

The name might be unfamiliar, but many diners would recognise the delicacy served at restaurants as "shark head". Many might not know, however, that the shovelnose ray is critically endangered.

Fortunately, the Singapore native, also known as the bottlenose wedgefish, will soon get better protection.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 30, 2019, with the headline 'Critically endangered ray to get better protection'. Print Edition | Subscribe