Critically endangered monkey that calls Singapore home

Only 61 Raffles' banded langurs left here, and study shows species may be threatened with extinction globally too

Genetic data from faecal samples has indicated that the Raffles' banded langur (above) is distinct enough from two other langur species in the region to be considered a species of its own. The other two are the Robinson's banded langur and the East S
Genetic data from faecal samples has indicated that the Raffles' banded langur (above) is distinct enough from two other langur species in the region to be considered a species of its own.PHOTO: ANDIE ANG

In the small cluster of forests left in the Central Catchment Nature Reserve, a black-and-white monkey lives on the brink of extinction.

With only 61 of them left here, the Raffles' banded langur is critically endangered in Singapore.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on December 23, 2019, with the headline 'Critically endangered monkey that calls S'pore home'. Subscribe