Critically endangered monkey that calls Singapore home

Only 61 Raffles' banded langurs left here, and study shows species may be threatened with extinction globally too

Genetic data from faecal samples has indicated that the Raffles' banded langur (above) is distinct enough from two other langur species in the region to be considered a species of its own. The other two are the Robinson's banded langur and the East S
Genetic data from faecal samples has indicated that the Raffles' banded langur (above) is distinct enough from two other langur species in the region to be considered a species of its own. PHOTO: ANDIE ANG
New: Gift this subscriber-only story to your friends and family

In the small cluster of forests left in the Central Catchment Nature Reserve, a black-and-white monkey lives on the brink of extinction.

With only 61 of them left here, the Raffles' banded langur is critically endangered in Singapore.

Already a subscriber? 

Read the full story and more at $9.90/month

Get exclusive reports and insights with more than 500 subscriber-only articles every month

Unlock these benefits

  • All subscriber-only content on ST app and straitstimes.com

  • Easy access any time via ST app on 1 mobile device

  • E-paper with 2-week archive so you won't miss out on content that matters to you

Join ST's Telegram channel and get the latest breaking news delivered to you.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on December 23, 2019, with the headline Critically endangered monkey that calls Singapore home. Subscribe