Bad air days? The problem could well be domestic

Traffic, power generation among local sources of pollution; another factor is construction dust: Study

Using data from computer simulation models and observations, Dr Lee Hsiang-He's study showed that about 40 per cent of bad air days in Singapore were caused by a combination of both domestic and foreign sources of air pollution. It suggested that a f
Using data from computer simulation models and observations, Dr Lee Hsiang-He's study showed that about 40 per cent of bad air days in Singapore were caused by a combination of both domestic and foreign sources of air pollution. It suggested that a further 25 per cent of bad air days here were caused by local sources of air pollution, such as traffic, power generation and industry.ST PHOTO: NG SOR LUAN

Forest fires in the region are often blamed for bad air days here, but new research has pointed to a different source of pollution - home.

Two out of every three bad air days in Singapore can be prevented by tackling domestic sources of air pollution, showed a study by Dr Lee Hsiang-He, a research scientist at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 31, 2018, with the headline 'Bad air days? The problem could well be domestic'. Subscribe