Bad air days? The problem could well be domestic

Using data from computer simulation models and observations, Dr Lee Hsiang-He's study showed that about 40 per cent of bad air days in Singapore were caused by a combination of both domestic and foreign sources of air pollution. It suggested that a f
Using data from computer simulation models and observations, Dr Lee Hsiang-He's study showed that about 40 per cent of bad air days in Singapore were caused by a combination of both domestic and foreign sources of air pollution. It suggested that a further 25 per cent of bad air days here were caused by local sources of air pollution, such as traffic, power generation and industry.ST PHOTO: NG SOR LUAN

Traffic, power generation among local sources of pollution; another factor is construction dust: Study

Forest fires in the region are often blamed for bad air days here, but new research has pointed to a different source of pollution - home.

Two out of every three bad air days in Singapore can be prevented by tackling domestic sources of air pollution, showed a study by Dr Lee Hsiang-He, a research scientist at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology.

TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE

Thank you for reading The Straits Times

You have reached one of our Premium stories. To continue reading, get access now or log in if you are a subscriber.

What is Premium?

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 31, 2018, with the headline 'Bad air days? The problem could well be domestic'. Print Edition | Subscribe