2.5m-long python with swollen belly rescued from drain in Bishan, likely to have eaten cat

A reticulated python with a swollen belly was spotted in a drain in Bishan on Oct 24, 2018. The snake was likely to have eaten a cat, said Acres.
A reticulated python with a swollen belly was spotted in a drain in Bishan on Oct 24, 2018. The snake was likely to have eaten a cat, said Acres.PHOTO: STOMP
A reticulated python with a swollen belly was spotted in a drain in Bishan on Oct 24, 2018. The snake was likely to have eaten a cat, said Acres.
A reticulated python with a swollen belly was spotted in a drain in Bishan on Oct 24, 2018. The snake was likely to have eaten a cat, said Acres.PHOTO: STOMP

SINGAPORE - A python about 2.5m-long was rescued in Bishan on Wednesday morning (Oct 24), after it was spotted resting in a drain with a swollen belly.

The snake was spotted at Block 166 Bishan Street 13, and the Animal Concerns Research and Education Society (Acres) was called in to rescue it.

According to citizen journalism website Stomp, the snake had also been slithering around a void deck in the estate. Pictures posted on the website showed the bloated snake in the drain and its subsequent capture by Acres officers.

In response to queries, Acres deputy chief executive Kalai Vanan told The Straits Times that the society received a call about the reticulated python at about 7.30am on Wednesday. The python, which is about 2.5m to 3m long, was rescued at about 8.40am.

He said that the swollen belly was likely due to the snake eating a cat.

"The snake will be microchipped and safely relocated to a more suitable habitat," added Mr Kalai.

Members of the public who see any wildlife in distress or in need of help can call the Acres 24-hour wildlife rescue team on 9783-7782.

 
 

A python recently made the headlines earlier this month after it bit a woman on the second storey of a Sembawang Housing Board block. But wildlife experts said that the incident was a freak accident, and that snakes generally shy away from people unless they feel threatened.

Wildlife consultant Subaraj Rajathurai had told ST that pythons do wander into areas around housing estates to look for food due to the loss of their natural habitat.

These reptiles usually hunt in drains and sewers for food, with cats and rats representing potential food sources for them, he added.