Spotting passions too early may limit students: Experts

Those with narrow focus may struggle with issues in other fields

Yale-NUS College assistant professor Paul O'Keefe said US students are told at graduation ceremonies they have to find their passions, which he calls "well intended" but "not the best message to send".
Yale-NUS College assistant professor Paul O'Keefe said US students are told at graduation ceremonies they have to find their passions, which he calls "well intended" but "not the best message to send". ST PHOTO: KELVIN CHNG
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Students should be wary of trying to identify their passions and interests too early in life as it could limit their education and hinder their potential, according to new research.

It noted that students who zero in on a narrow range of interests would find it difficult tackling problems that arise in other disciplines.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on July 09, 2018, with the headline Spotting passions too early may limit students: Experts. Subscribe