ITE students create real-life solutions with AI in Intel project

Institute of Technical Education students Chew Chu Xuan and Glenda Chong developed a mini-robot that reminds elderly patients to take their medication.
Institute of Technical Education students Chew Chu Xuan and Glenda Chong developed a mini-robot that reminds elderly patients to take their medication.ST PHOTO: NG SOR LUAN

SINGAPORE - Institute of Technical Education (ITE) students have used artificial intelligence (AI) in projects that aim to solve real-world problems.

Among these projects are a mini-robot that reminds elderly patients to take their medication, and an interactive signboard that "catches" errant cyclists in void decks.

These projects are part of a programme jointly launched by ITE College West and Intel, with the aim of equipping students with technical knowledge on the practical use of AI.

The pilot Intel Artificial Intelligence for Youth (AI4Y) programme had 1,120 students enrolled last year, with 23 developing a total of nine AI projects.

Students could opt to join a boot camp that engaged them in practical workshops and work on a final hands-on project to showcase their skills.

AI4Y hopes to reach up to 15,000 students, and will be rolled out in phases starting with the School of Electronics & Info-comm Technology (SEIT) in ITE College West.

"The ITE-Intel partnership and AI for Youth programme will go a long way in equipping our students with AI social and technical skills for real world applications", said Ms Low Khah Gek, chief executive officer of ITE.

These real world applications included coming up with a potential mini robot to remind elderly persons to take their medication in a timely and correct manner.

An alarm notifies the user when it is time to take the medication. The user can then scan the medicine packet and have the instructions read to them in their preferred dialect, including the dosage and purpose of the medication.

 
 

"My grandfather had trouble reading the instructions as he couldn't understand English," said Mr Chew Chu Xuan, who worked on the project with teammate Glenda Chong. "The words were also very small, so I wanted to help those who faced the same problem as he did."

The two 18 year-old students are now working on integrating this program with a toy Alpha Mini robot, and to enhance its usability.

Other projects included an interactive signboard that aimed to deter errant cyclists in void decks by capturing their faces on the board. The students were inspired by the recent ban on personal mobility devices (PMD), and wanted to eventually come up with a solution to promote socially responsible behaviour.


Mr Lo Kai Kiat and Mr Muhd Nuralfian Abdul Rashid developed an interactive signboard that aimed to deter errant cyclists in void decks by capturing their faces on the board. ST PHOTO: NG SOR LUAN

In another project to promote recycling, students used AI technology to sort product packaging into correct categories. This was carried out with shampoo dispensers, plastic bottles and egg crates.

All projects are currently in the prototype stage.


(Clockwise from top left) Mr Muhd Adam B. Abu Hasan, Mr K. Eswaran, Mr Franklin Braden Ron and Mr Ang Jin Heng used AI technology to sort product packaging into correct categories. ST PHOTO: NG SOR LUAN

Meanwhile, 20 lecturers from the three ITE colleges have undergone a five-day training provided by Intel. By the end of June this year, 60 staff across all schools should be AI-trained to use the AI4Y program.

"ITE Singapore is the first deployment of the Intel AI for Youth program in ASEAN countries," said the College on Tuesday (21 Jan).

The students were also eligible for a two-week exchange program to South Korea.

 
 

Through this collaboration with ITE, Intel hopes to "democratise AI by empowering youth with the necessary AI skills", said Dr Anjan Ghosh, global director of the Program, Partnership and Policy Group, Intel Corporation.

Beyond empowering youths, ITE also hopes to extend the AI training program to adult learners as well, so that they can be AI-ready in the workplace.