Finding her voice and making friends through singing

Marianne Leong, 15, used to struggle with speaking, swallowing and chewing because of dyspraxia, a developmental disorder that affects muscle control. But now she is a soprano in a choir that performs overseas.
Marianne Leong, 15, used to struggle with speaking, swallowing and chewing because of dyspraxia, a developmental disorder that affects muscle control. But now she is a soprano in a choir that performs overseas.ST PHOTO: ALVIN HO

Meet two students of Pathlight School, a school for high-functioning children with autism, who show how they are not defined by this condition, but by their resilience and extraordinary abilities.

She could barely chew or swallow when she was younger, but now, she is a soprano and part of a choir that performs internationally.

For 15-year-old Marianne Leong of Pathlight School, singing has always been her passion. However, she has dyspraxia, a developmental disorder that affects muscle control, impeding movement, coordination, language and speech.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 14, 2018, with the headline 'Finding her voice and making friends through singing'. Print Edition | Subscribe