Early diagnosis may keep dementia at bay

If dementia is caught early, more can be done to stem or even reverse the ravages of this potentially devastating illness. One patient tells Chang Ai-Lien of her efforts to stave off the disease.

Retiree Margaret Tan was found to have harmful amyloid proteins in her brain, which could be a precursor to Alzheimer's disease. She is taking part in a clinical trial of anti-amyloid drugs, and keeping herself fit, healthy and socially active to sta
Retiree Margaret Tan was found to have harmful amyloid proteins in her brain, which could be a precursor to Alzheimer's disease. She is taking part in a clinical trial of anti-amyloid drugs, and keeping herself fit, healthy and socially active to stave off dementia, from which her late mother suffered in the last decade of her life.ST PHOTOS: ARIFFIN JAMAR

Retired clerk Margaret Tan saw her late mother transform in the last decade of her life.

It started out with buying sprees because she could not remember the groceries she had at home. The tins of Ovaltine and milk powder stacked up.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 20, 2018, with the headline 'Early diagnosis may keep dementia at bay'. Print Edition | Subscribe