Victims lose over $133k in scam linked to unpaid LTA fines, more than 100 police reports filed

The victims would receive text messages that were purportedly from LTA notifying them of unpaid bills or fines. PHOTO: ST FILE

SINGAPORE - There have been at least 112 police reports made since Oct 13 regarding phishing scams involving unpaid fines or bills to the Land Transport Authority (LTA).

Victims have lost at least $133,000 to the scammers.

In an advisory issued on Friday, the police said the victims would receive text messages that were purportedly from LTA notifying them of unpaid bills or fines.

They would then click on a link embedded in the messages to view information regarding the supposed fines, but would instead be directed to fraudulent websites.

After they provide their credit or debit card details and one-time passwords (OTPs), they would subsequently discover unauthorised transactions made with their cards.

Victims would click on a link embedded in the messages to view information regarding the supposed fines, but would instead be directed to fraudulent websites. PHOTO: SINGAPORE POLICE FORCE

The police said LTA does not ask for payment via URL links in its SMS alerts on offence notices, vehicle registration and licensing matters.

They advise the public not to click on URL links provided in these text messages and to always verify the authenticity of the information with the official sources or website.

The police also urge the public to never disclose personal or Internet banking details and OTPs to anyone, to report any fraudulent credit or debit card charges to the bank, and to cancel the card immediately.

Those who have information on such crimes can call the police hotline on 1800-255-0000, or submit it online at www.police.gov.sg/iwitness. All information will be kept confidential. Those who require urgent police assistance should dial 999.

For more information on scams, visit www.scamalert.sg or call the Anti-Scam Hotline on 1800-722-6688.

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