When does sharing info breach Secrets Act? It depends on what’s shared and who does it, say lawyers

Lawyers say there's no clear-cut answer - it depends on what was shared, who shared it

Those convicted of an offence under the Official Secrets Act - which seeks to prevent disclosure of official documents and information - can be jailed for up to two years and fined up to $2,000. PHOTO: ST FILE
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Treading the ever finer line between innocent sharing on social media and contravening the Official Secrets Act (OSA) is becoming an increasingly nerve-racking exercise.

Take these two examples. A man drives past a fatal accident where the victim's body is still lying on the road. He takes a photo and shares it with friends on WhatsApp.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 13, 2019, with the headline When does sharing info breach Secrets Act? It depends on what’s shared and who does it, say lawyers . Subscribe