Look Back 2019: Spotlight on disturbing compulsion of voyeurism

This year saw a raft of changes to the law to deal with new, emerging crimes and to afford more and better protection for the vulnerable among us

Experts say technology has enabled voyeurs to film their victims easily and disseminate the material online instantaneously.
Experts say technology has enabled voyeurs to film their victims easily and disseminate the material online instantaneously. TNP FILE PHOTO
NUS undergraduate Monica Baey brought the issue of voyeurism to the fore by speaking up against what she saw as lenient treatment of a fellow student who had filmed her in the shower.
NUS undergraduate Monica Baey brought the issue of voyeurism to the fore by speaking up against what she saw as lenient treatment of a fellow student who had filmed her in the shower. ST FILE PHOTO

The disturbing compulsion of voyeurism was thrust into the spotlight this year following key changes to the law and the hotly debated Monica Baey saga.

Changes to the Penal Code will mean treating the act of voyeurism as a specific offence with its own range of punishments. Those who observe, record or possess recordings of someone else doing a private act, without consent, could be jailed for up to two years, and may also be caned and fined.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on December 27, 2019, with the headline 'CRIME/LAWS - Spotlight on disturbing compulsion of voyeurism'. Subscribe