Claims of 'plastic' keropok being sold at Hari Raya Bazaar false: AVA

The authority's response comes after Facebook user Anissul Asaad posted a video of the man at the bazaar and questioned his actions. In the video, the man could be seen setting a piece of cracker on fire with a lighter in front of a stall.
The authority's response comes after Facebook user Anissul Asaad posted a video of the man at the bazaar and questioned his actions. In the video, the man could be seen setting a piece of cracker on fire with a lighter in front of a stall.PHOTOS: FACEBOOK/ ANISSUL ASAAD

SINGAPORE - The claims made by a man in a viral video that keropok lekor or fish crackers made from plastic are being sold at this year's Hari Raya Bazaar are false, the Agri-Food and Veterinary Authority (AVA) said.

"Fake food is in the spotlight again," AVA said in its statement on Facebook on Thursday night (May 24) as it cautioned against the spread of misinformation by the public.

AVA also clarified in its statement that it has not received any feedback on the crackers and it has not detected any food made with synthetic materials in Singapore.

The authority's response comes after Facebook user Anissul Asaad posted a video of the man at the bazaar on Tuesday and questioned his actions.

In the video, the man could be seen setting a piece of cracker on fire with a lighter in front of a stall.

A woman with him was heard saying to the stallholder: "If it is not plastic, it should not burn like this right? We just bought this."

The man added: "Please don't sell the keropok. It is plastic."

He also claimed that he could tell the crackers were made from plastic by their smell.

Another person could be heard saying: "I'm sad, I just ate something that is made from plastic. I can't believe I ate plastic."

As of Friday morning, the video has received more than 471,000 views and over 5,300 shares on Facebook.

AVA said that the man had claimed the keropok was made of plastic because it seemed to be burning continuously after it was lit.

But, in actual fact, food products containing fats, carbohydrates and protein could burn in this manner and become charred, AVA added.

In the post, AVA reminded the public to exercise good judgment on whether their information sources are credible, before spreading news.

It added: "We are sure you wouldn't want to be the one spreading misinformation and causing unnecessary public alarm and confusion to the public."

The public can refer to AVA's website and social media accounts for updates.