Charging phones with food waste

University researchers develop system to convert leftover food into electricity

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(Far left) Dr Zhang Jingxin blending the food before it goes into the anaerobic digester. (Left) Prof Tong Yen Wah shows student Gu Danning how the food-waste powered charging station in NUS' Raffles Hall works.
Dr Zhang Jingxin blending the food before it goes into the anaerobic digester. ST PHOTOS: TIMOTHY DAVID
(Far left) Dr Zhang Jingxin blending the food before it goes into the anaerobic digester. (Left) Prof Tong Yen Wah shows student Gu Danning how the food-waste powered charging station in NUS' Raffles Hall works.
Prof Tong Yen Wah shows student Gu Danning how the food-waste powered charging station in NUS' Raffles Hall works. ST PHOTOS: TIMOTHY DAVID
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It may look like any other mobile phone-charging station, but this locker-like system at the corner of the National University of Singapore's Raffles Hall is actually powered by food waste.

Some 40kg of food, once thrown away each day by students staying at the hall, is now converted into electricity they can use to charge their mobile phones and tablets.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 16, 2018, with the headline Charging phones with food waste. Subscribe