Cannabis-infused cakes, 'Ice' and drug paraphernalia seized in CNB bust

Cakes believed to be infused with cannabis recovered from a residential unit in the vicinity of Upper Cross Street, on April 28, 2021.
Cakes believed to be infused with cannabis recovered from a residential unit in the vicinity of Upper Cross Street, on April 28, 2021.PHOTO: CENTRAL NARCOTICS BUREAU

SINGAPORE - They look like chocolate cakes but beware.

Some 87 cannabis-infused cakes, along with about 36g of Ice, were seized on Wednesday (April 28) evening after a 38-year-old Singaporean man was arrested in the vicinity of Upper Cross Street.

In a statement on Friday (April 30), the Central Narcotics Bureau (CNB) said that various drug paraphernalia were also seized from the man's hideout, a residential unit, in the area.

Investigations are continuing into the man's drug activities.

The CNB statement contained photographs of the cakes, which were individually packed. Each had a sticker bearing the words "keep calm and have a brownie".

Cannabis has been decriminalised or legalised in some places around the world where the sale of the drug and/or products containing it are allowed.

But the CNB has noted that there is scant evidence of the safety and efficacy of long-term cannabis use. It said these findings corroborate Singapore's position that cannabis should remain an illicit drug.

The CNB reminded the public that it is "addictive and harmful, and is a Class A controlled drug listed under Singapore's Misuse of Drugs Act (MDA)".

The consumption, possession, trafficking, import or export of any controlled drugs, including cannabis and cannabis products, is an offence under the Act.



Cakes believed to be infused with cannabis recovered from a residential unit in the vicinity of Upper Cross Street, on April 28, 2021. 
PHOTO: CENTRAL NARCOTICS BUREAU

The bureau urged parents to play an active part in protecting the youth from "the menace of drugs", and to remind their children that they should not consume products unknown to them, or offered by strangers.

"To entice more youths to consume these products, they are often disguised as candy or other food products," it added.

Members of the public can call the CNB hotline on 1800-325-6666 for advice and assistance if they come across such suspected food products, or are worried that their children may be involved with drugs.

Those who have drug-related information can make a report to CNB by calling 1800-325-6666 or at this website.