Bridging differences, and racing with the best

Ms Joscelin Yeo says sport has a wonderful way of bridging differences and divides, not only for our generation, but also for our children's generation.
Ms Joscelin Yeo says sport has a wonderful way of bridging differences and divides, not only for our generation, but also for our children's generation.PHOTO: SINGAPORE INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION

The articles here were first published in the book Singapore: Insights from the Inside (Volume III) edited by Sue-Ann Chia and published by the Singapore International Foundation. It features stories on what Asean means to people around the world, and was published to commemorate Singapore's chairmanship of Asean this year.

It was three hours, twice a day, six days a week - staring down a black line at the bottom of the pool. That was the amount of time I spent training for a race that took only about two minutes.

The question I am often asked is: "What makes you wake up at 4.30 in the morning to jump into ice cold water for two hours, go to school or work and then do it again later in the day?" Not only is the schedule gruelling, some think it can drive you mad because you cannot talk to anyone when you are mostly submerged underwater. I beg to differ. Swimming may be an individual sport but it is not a lonely sport.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on July 01, 2018, with the headline 'Bridging differences, and racing with the best'. Print Edition | Subscribe