Beware of phishing SMS, Facebook ads targeting DBS customers: DBS Bank

One SMS message riddled with grammatical errors claims that DBS had just announced new software that “will probably make hundreds of Singaporeans to become millionaires”.
One SMS message riddled with grammatical errors claims that DBS had just announced new software that “will probably make hundreds of Singaporeans to become millionaires”.PHOTO: FACEBOOK/PHV RIDERS AND DRIVERS SINGAPORE-GRAB RYDE KARDI
The website invites users to sign up for a fake membership programme called DBS Code and promises that members can earn $13,000 through bitcoin investments in just 24 hours.
The website invites users to sign up for a fake membership programme called DBS Code and promises that members can earn $13,000 through bitcoin investments in just 24 hours.PHOTO: SCREENGRAB FROM DBS.COM.SG

SINGAPORE - DBS Bank issued a warning last Thursday (July 26), which was updated on Tuesday, alerting customers to a phishing SMS message and a misleading advertisement appearing on Facebook.

One SMS message riddled with grammatical errors claims that DBS had just announced new software that "will probably make hundreds of Singaporeans to become millionaires".

The message purportedly sent by "DBSBANK" contains a link hidden behind a URL shortening service and invites the recipient to check if they qualify.

DBS also highlighted a malicious ad on Facebook that features a picture of a DBS Bank outlet.

The links lead to a malicious website claiming to be a DBS investment programme. It is designed to trick users into making fraudulent bank transfers or credit card transactions, DBS said.

The website invites users to sign up for a fake membership programme called DBS Code and promises that members can earn $13,000 through bitcoin investments in just 24 hours.

Users are then asked to enter their credit card details and billing information. Fine print on the website claims that it is operated by a Bulgarian company registered in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria.

In response to queries, a DBS spokesman said that the bank took immediate action to have the fraudulent sites taken down.

DBS advised customers to stay alert when browsing online or social media platforms. It said customers who encounter suspicious websites, online ads, SMS messages and e-mails, or notice unknown transactions appearing in their accounts, can call the DBS hotline on 1800-111-1111.