Coronavirus pandemic

Artists' works on sale to raise funds for charities of their choice

Artist Erica Wee with her painting of a leopard that represents a world on the lookout as the coronavirus was discovered. It is up for sale as part of the Sound of Art Covid-19 Fundraiser.
Artist Erica Wee with her painting of a leopard that represents a world on the lookout as the coronavirus was discovered. It is up for sale as part of the Sound of Art Covid-19 Fundraiser.PHOTO: COURTESY OF ERICA WEE

Effort by Sound of Art features 10 pieces by four artists, with over $13,000 raised so far

Overwhelmed with emotion as the Covid-19 pandemic started to spread worldwide, full-time artist Erica Wee channelled her feelings into painting.

In March, the 49-year-old Singaporean living in Malaysia completed a set of four paintings of animals.

Her first piece of a leopard represents a world on the lookout, depicting the mood when the coronavirus was discovered and when things were uncertain.

Her second piece, depicting a zebra, is about quiet resilience as the world battles the deadly pandemic.

The other two pieces are of a lion, representing emergence from the darkness, and an elephant, symbolising breaking through.

These four paintings are part of the Sound of Art Covid-19 Fundraiser, organised by art platform Sound of Art. It was launched on May 1 and will end on June 30.

Those interested can view the paintings at this website.

The fund-raiser features 10 artworks, including landscape and abstract pieces, from four artists, with all proceeds from the sale of the artists' work going to charities of their choice.

If all pieces are sold, they would raise $18,900. The pieces are each priced from $1,500 to $3,000.

The other artists involved in the fund-raiser are Ms Jacintha Pillay, 43, who is a lawyer, as well as Ms Glacy Soh, 57, and Ms Jennifer Tan, 54, both full-time artists.

So far, six pieces have been sold, including Ms Wee's painting of the lion. An additional piece by Ms Soh, not originally included in the fund-raiser, has also been sold, with the buyer asking for the proceeds to also be given to charity.

That brings the total proceeds from the seven pieces sold so far to $13,300.

Ms Wee's chosen charity is YMCA of Singapore's Wok The Talk project, which engages hawkers and cabbies or private-hire drivers to prepare and deliver grocery packs and meals to vulnerable groups such as seniors, people with special needs and low-income families.

 
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"The money will really go to where the help is needed. There are pockets of people out there who are struggling with three meals and basic necessities," said Ms Wee, who spent 15 years in business and entrepreneurship before picking up the brush again in 2016.

Mr Galven Lee, co-founder of Sound of Art, encourages people to get creative in thinking about the many ways they can support and bring joy to others.

"The joy that comes from serving others is one of the most fulfilling experiences you can have during this period," he said.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 22, 2020, with the headline 'Artists' works on sale to raise funds for charities of their choice'. Print Edition | Subscribe