My Turf

Kranji Marshes: A beacon for bird lovers

Nature lovers can also look out for the black baza at the marshes in the early mornings. Nationally threatened species like the purple swamphen (above) and red-wattled lapwing have been spotted at Kranji Marshes. Dr Adrian Loo, NParks' group director
Nationally threatened species like the purple swamphen (above) and red-wattled lapwing have been spotted at Kranji Marshes. Dr Adrian Loo, NParks’ group director for conservation, says the marshes are also a strategic stopover point for migratory birds. PHOTO: COURTESY OF BERNARD SEAH
Nature lovers can also look out for the black baza at the marshes in the early mornings. Nationally threatened species like the purple swamphen (above) and red-wattled lapwing have been spotted at Kranji Marshes. Dr Adrian Loo, NParks' group director
Birds of prey like the Japanese sparrowhawk can be spotted in the early mornings. PHOTO: COURTESY OF FRANCIS YAP
Birds of prey like the Japanese sparrowhawk can be spotted in the early mornings.
Nature lovers can also look out for the black baza at the marshes in the early mornings. PHOTO: COURTESY OF FRANCIS YAP

My Turf is a fortnightly series that aims to share untold stories of our neighbourhoods. In this instalment, we take a look at Kranji Marshes.

Not that many people make the trek out to Kranji Marshes, which is about 20 minutes' walk away from the nearest bus stop in a remote corner of the island.

But the journey is well worth the effort, not least for migratory birds of prey, such as the Japanese sparrowhawk, which have flown all the way here from North-east Asia to escape winter.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 14, 2018, with the headline 'A beacon for bird lovers'. Print Edition | Subscribe