30 investigated for suspected involvement in public assembly without permit

Thirty people are being investigated for suspected involvement in a public assembly without a police permit after they gathered at Sembawang Park on Saturday (Jan 21).
Thirty people are being investigated for suspected involvement in a public assembly without a police permit after they gathered at Sembawang Park on Saturday (Jan 21). PHOTO: LIANHE WANBAO

SINGAPORE - Thirty people are being investigated for suspected involvement in a public assembly without a police permit.

Police said in a statement on Sunday (Jan 22) that the group, aged between 21 and 56, had gathered at Sembawang Park on Saturday.

Some of them had placards, and preliminary investigation showed that they were there to show support for the bull-taming practice known as Jallikattu and for ongoing protests in India against the banning of the sport last year.

Jallikattu is typically practised in Tamil Nadu in India as part of the festivities during Pongal, a harvest festival celebrated around January. Bulls are let loose in an open field and young men compete to subdue them bare-handed.

It was banned in India last year over animal welfare concerns, but the ban was reportedly revoked on Saturday in Tamil Nadu after days of protests.

The investigations here follow a Police statement last week reminding the public of Singapore's laws regarding public assembly. This was after the Police came to know of plans to hold a Jallikattu-related event.

In its statement on Sunday, the Police once again reminded the public that organising or participating in a public assembly without a police permit is illegal in Singapore.

"Foreigners visiting or living in Singapore have to abide by our laws. They should not import the politics of their own countries into Singapore. Those who break the law will be dealt with firmly, and this may include the termination of visas or work passes, where applicable," said the Police.