Singapore's water security

Water still an existential issue, despite advances

Last month, Singapore officially opened its third desalination plant in Tuas, which can produce enough water to supply 200,000 households. Up to 30 per cent of Singapore's water needs can now be met by turning sea water into drinking water. Two more
Last month, Singapore officially opened its third desalination plant in Tuas, which can produce enough water to supply 200,000 households. Up to 30 per cent of Singapore's water needs can now be met by turning sea water into drinking water. Two more such plants are in the works, in Marina East and on Jurong Island.ST PHOTO: KHALID BABA

S'pore has made big steps towards water security but still gets most of its raw water from Johor

As Singaporeans would have noticed in recent weeks, nothing encapsulates the intertwining of politics, technology and the environment quite like water.

This scarce resource first returned to the national spotlight last month, when Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad criticised the water supply deal between Singapore and his country, saying that the price at which water is sold to the Republic is "ridiculous".

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on July 08, 2018, with the headline 'Water still an existential issue, despite advances'. Print Edition | Subscribe