Presidential hopeful Farid Khan debunks online article's claim that he supports prosecution of Aung San Suu Kyi

Presidential hopeful Farid Khan has debunked an online report that claimed he supported taking Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi to court.
Presidential hopeful Farid Khan has debunked an online report that claimed he supported taking Myanmar's Aung San Suu Kyi to court.PHOTO: LIANHE ZAOBAO

SINGAPORE - Presidential hopeful Farid Khan has refuted a report by an alternative news site claiming that he supports taking Myanmar's de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi to court over violence against the Muslim Rohingya in Myanmar's Rakhine state .

All Singapore Stuff published on Tuesday (Sept 5) an article in which it said Mr Farid had "thrown his weight" behind a petition calling on the European Court of Human Rights to try Ms Suu Kyi for human rights violations over the bloodshed against the minority Rohingya community.

Mr Farid said in a statement on his official Facebook page: "The report is completely untrue."

The article also included a screenshot of a post on Mr Farid's personal Facebook account, which appeared to be a link to the petition.

Mr Farid said the link had been posted on his personal Facebook page accidentally by a member of his media team. The person was managing the Facebook account when he shared several posts by mistake.

"This happened as a result of using a touch screen device," said Mr Farid, adding: "As I do not wish for the incident to be repeated, I have closed my personal Facebook account."

Years of tension between the Muslim Rohingya and the majority Buddhist population in Myanmar's Rakhine state have spilled over into violence.

Nearly 90,000 Rohingya have fled to Bangladesh since violence erupted in Myanmar last month, triggered by an attack on Aug 25 on dozens of police posts and an army base by Rohingya insurgents.

Ms Suu Kyi, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate, has been accused of not speaking out for the Rohingya despite their complaints of persecution.

Last month, another presidential hopeful, Mr Salleh Marican, had to clear the air on an article posted on social news website Mothership, which had wrongly attributed to him comments on the hijab.

The remarks, on the erosion of Malay culture in Singapore due to increasing religiosity, were originally posted on a Facebook page titled "Salleh Marican for President".

The page, which does not belong to Mr Salleh, has been deleted. Mothership apologised and removed the erroneous article.