New normal @ work

Designers go back to the drawing board to address the physical, social and digital needs of the workplace in the light of Covid-19

Allowing for social distancing yet creating spaces for creative collaboration. This will be a fixture in office designs going forward, as seen in global beverage distribution company Beam Suntory’s Singapore office, designed by M Moser Associates.
Allowing for social distancing yet creating spaces for creative collaboration. This will be a fixture in office designs going forward, as seen in global beverage distribution company Beam Suntory’s Singapore office, designed by M Moser Associates. PHOTO: OWEN RAGETT
The open atrium in Bridge+ at CapitaLand Ascendas Plaza, Shanghai, lifts spirits with its expanse of space and natural light.
The open atrium in Bridge+ at CapitaLand Ascendas Plaza, Shanghai, lifts spirits with its expanse of space and natural light. PHOTO: SPACE MATRIX
Mr Colin Seah of Ministry of Design imagines that instead of conventional meeting rooms, the new office gathering space of tomorrow can be modelled after social spaces found in homes such as living rooms and open kitchens. This project, called Canvas Hous
Mr Colin Seah of Ministry of Design imagines that instead of conventional meeting rooms, the new office gathering space of tomorrow can be modelled after social spaces found in homes such as living rooms and open kitchens. This project, called Canvas House, is a restored Blair Road shophouse commissioned by co-living operator Figment. PHOTO: EDWARD HENDRICKS
PHD Singapore’s feature wall at the entrance of its department within parent company Omnicom Media Group’s office at Alice@Mediapolis in Buona Vista. The space incorporates greenery on walls and ceiling for a calming effect.
PHD Singapore’s feature wall at the entrance of its department within parent company Omnicom Media Group’s office at Alice@Mediapolis in Buona Vista. The space incorporates greenery on walls and ceiling for a calming effect. PHOTO: SPACE MATRIX
This Northern Trust office in Pune, India, showcases rich, variegated textures that add a sensory appeal. Wooden planks, exposed bricks and greenery help forge a distinctive character in the interiors.
This Northern Trust office in Pune, India, showcases rich, variegated textures that add a sensory appeal. Wooden planks, exposed bricks and greenery help forge a distinctive character in the interiors. PHOTO: SPACE MATRIX
Gift this subscriber-only story to your friends and family

Working on-site may finally be in the sights of companies in the United States and Europe, as restrictions to limit the ravages of the coronavirus pandemic are tentatively lifted.

In Singapore, this will likely not happen until June 1, when the circuit breaker ends.

Already a subscriber? 

Read the full story and more at $9.90/month

Get exclusive reports and insights with more than 500 subscriber-only articles every month

Unlock these benefits

  • All subscriber-only content on ST app and straitstimes.com

  • Easy access any time via ST app on 1 mobile device

  • E-paper with 2-week archive so you won't miss out on content that matters to you

Join ST's Telegram channel and get the latest breaking news delivered to you.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on April 25, 2020, with the headline New normal @ work. Subscribe