Singapore band Wormrot perform in a 'train' at Glastonbury

Wormrot vocalist Mohammad Arif Suhaimi performing on the Earache Express on June 23, 2017.
Wormrot vocalist Mohammad Arif Suhaimi performing on the Earache Express on June 23, 2017.PHOTO: EARACHE RECORDS
(From left) Guitarist Mohammad Nurrasyid Juraimi, Digby Pearson, founder of recording label Earache Records, vocalist Mohammad Arif Suhaimi, and drummer Vijesh Ashok Ghariwala.
(From left) Guitarist Mohammad Nurrasyid Juraimi, Digby Pearson, founder of recording label Earache Records, vocalist Mohammad Arif Suhaimi, and drummer Vijesh Ashok Ghariwala.PHOTO: NUR AZEAN MALIK
Wormrot are the first Singapore act to perform at the United Kingdom's Glastonbury Festival, one of the biggest and most prominent music festivals in the world.
Wormrot are the first Singapore act to perform at the United Kingdom's Glastonbury Festival, one of the biggest and most prominent music festivals in the world. PHOTO: ROTWORKS

Things were hot and heavy at Glastonbury for Singapore band Wormrot - in a good way.

The grindcore rockers played the first of their two sets on June 23 night on the Earache Express, a stage set within a train carriage that had its seats taken out.

Says vocalist Mohammad Arif Suhaimi, 33: "It was packed, overwhelming, there was no space, and we had no rehearsals before our performance."

Wormrot, formed in 2007, are the first Singapore act to perform at the United Kingdom's Glastonbury Festival, one of the biggest and most prominent music festivals in the world. The three-man band also include guitarist Mohammad Nurrasyid Juraimi, 33, and drummer Vijesh Ashok Ghariwala, 26.

They were slightly disconcerted by the fact that they were playing to two different crowds - one on a level below the stage and another on the same level as the stage.

Says Arif: "We were not quite sure how to perform to both crowds at the same time."

But the audience's rave reactions to their act put all their fears to rest.

Says Vijesh: "It was awesome. The audience was going nuts when we performed."

This year's festival is headlined by world stars such as Radiohead, Ed Sheeran, Katy Perry and Foo Fighters.

For Wormrot's 45-minute long set on Friday night, they played some 30 songs, each lasting about a minute.

Nurrasyid says the number that received the best response was Fallen Into Disuse.

Describing it as slow, but heavy, he says it was lapped up by the audience because it was a break from the speed and intensity of their other numbers.

Speaking to The Straits Times just after their Friday set, the band say they intend to catch some shut-eye before their next two performances on Saturday (June 24).

"We can't wait," says Vijesh. "The Friday night show was just the warm-up for us."