ArtScience Museum: Life in plastic, far from fantastic

The ArtScience Museum's exhibition, Planet Or Plastic?, demonstrates the pollution caused by plastics with arresting artefacts and visuals

British photographer Mandy Barker's work features 633 soccer balls collected from 23 countries and islands in Europe, found on 104 beaches by 62 members of the public in just four months. A display showing the plastic rubbish collected on Singapore's
British photographer Mandy Barker's work features 633 soccer balls collected from 23 countries and islands in Europe, found on 104 beaches by 62 members of the public in just four months.PHOTO: MANDY BARKER
British photographer Mandy Barker's work features 633 soccer balls collected from 23 countries and islands in Europe, found on 104 beaches by 62 members of the public in just four months. A display showing the plastic rubbish collected on Singapore's
A display showing the plastic rubbish collected on Singapore's shores in one day.ST PHOTO: ARIFFIN JAMAR
British photographer Mandy Barker's work features 633 soccer balls collected from 23 countries and islands in Europe, found on 104 beaches by 62 members of the public in just four months. A display showing the plastic rubbish collected on Singapore's
A National Geographic photograph of marine life affected by plastic pollution at the exhibition.ST PHOTO: ARIFFIN JAMAR

Four artfully lit pedestals in the ArtScience Museum's new exhibition hold curated objects.

Instead of artworks, however, the displays offer up a pile of flip-flops and small buckets of straws, among other things.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 15, 2020, with the headline 'Life in plastic, far from fantastic'. Print Edition | Subscribe