5 Things to do today: Stream a Malay arts festival, try sour and spicy instant noodles and more

Stay in and help fight Covid-19. The Straits Times recommends fun, uplifting things to do each day

SSO made its official debut at the Singapore Conference Hall in 1979 under the baton of founding conductor Choo Hoey (above, centre).
The new works include two performances by dance group Artistari Gentari (above).PHOTO: AIRISU.CO/ESPLANADE

1. STREAM: Esplanade's Malay arts festival Pesta Raya

Enjoy theatre, dance, concerts and a storytelling session in the Esplanade's annual Malay arts festival Pesta Raya.

The 19th edition of the festival takes place online. There are three new works and six productions from past editions of the festival.

The new works include two performances by dance group Artistari Gentari (above).

Mari Menari! (Let's Dance!) Joget Hitam Manis ft. Pucuk Pisang features a medley of two classic joget songs, while #stateofemergency is a contemporary Malay work with choreography by Badarudin Hassan, film direction by film production group SortCo and music by musician and songwriter Aidil Akmal.

All the performances can be viewed for free on the Esplanade website from now until Sunday.

Info: bit.ly/2zW2T0W


2. EAT: Sour and spicy instant noodles


A taste test of eight types of spicy cup noodles (above) was done via video-conferencing platform Zoom. PHOTO: ST FILE

Try suan la fen, or sour and spicy noodles, the hottest cup-noodle trend from China to sweep Singapore.

Each cup - printed with cute cartoons and catch-phrases - is filled with individually packed ingredients.

More fancy options include vacuum-sealed clams, scallops and mushrooms - along with seasoning powders, vinegar and mala sauce.

A taste test of eight types of spicy cup noodles was done via video-conferencing platform Zoom. The judges were ST food editor Tan Hsueh Yun, ST senior food correspondent Wong Ah Yoke and chef-owner Willin Low of the Wild Rocket Group.

Info: bit.ly/2YkeEYo


3. WATCH: How Singaporeans have weathered the pandemic


Lilin (above) is a Singapore Airlines crew member who becomes a care ambassador in a hospital, while private-hire car driver Fadzuly struggles with falling demand. PHOTO: GOV.SG

Lilin is a Singapore Airlines crew member who becomes a care ambassador in a hospital, while private-hire car driver Fadzuly struggles with falling demand.

They are among the characters in four short films inspired by true stories of how Singaporeans have weathered the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Stronger Together films, commissioned by the Ministry of Communications and Information, were launched on June 13. The works, which have dialogue in English, Chinese, Malay and Tamil, are directed by local film-makers Royston Tan, Caleb Huang, Alvin Lee and He Shuming. 

Info: bit.ly/37OyGgJ


4. LOOK BACK: SSO's first overseas trip


SSO made its official debut at the Singapore Conference Hall in 1979 under the baton of founding conductor Choo Hoey (above, centre). PHOTO: SINGAPORE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Forty years ago on this day, the Singapore Symphony Orchestra (SSO) performed overseas for the first time. The orchestra was founded in 1979.

On June 23, 1980, it performed at the Civic Centre concert hall in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia, with guest soloist Singapore-born pianist Seow Yit Kin. The orchestra also played at Dewan Sri Pinang, a multi-purpose auditorium in Penang, the next day.

Since then, the SSO has performed in various countries in Europe and Asia, as well as the United States.

Read about how the orchestra celebrated its 40th anniversary last year and learn about its milestones.

Info: bit.ly/3eljTN6


5. LEARN: Paper marbling

SSO made its official debut at the Singapore Conference Hall in 1979 under the baton of founding conductor Choo Hoey (above, centre).
Try your hand at paper marbling (above), which involves floating and manipulating paints on a surface of thickened liquid to create abstract and colourful patterns. PHOTO: JEFFREY ANG/ARTEFAKTS

Try your hand at paper marbling which involves floating and manipulating paints on a surface of thickened liquid to create abstract and colourful patterns.

Graphic designer and art educator Jeffrey Ang, 61, shares how one can make paper marbling designs such as floral burst, hearts and fantasy swirl.

  • Write in 

  • We would also like to hear from you, our readers, on how you are coping and keeping busy while at home. Please send us videos, pictures, stories, poems or other contributions at stlife@sph.com.sg or on ST's Facebook and Instagram accounts. We will curate and showcase some of these, including at str.sg/stayhomeST

He founded Artefakts, a boutique art studio at Goodman Arts Centre, in 2016. He teaches paper marbling to private clients as well as charities and community organisations. 

Info: bit.ly/30ZuadX

Compiled by Prisca Ang, with input from SPH Information Resource Centre

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 23, 2020, with the headline '5 Things to do today '. Print Edition | Subscribe