TRAIN TO NOWHERE

A view of the Kruger National Park (above) from a room at the Kruger Shalati hotel. 	In the middle of Kruger National Park, South Africa's most celebrated game reserve, a luxury train takes passengers, but never moves. At the Kruger Shalati (right) -
A view of the Kruger National Park (above) from a room at the Kruger Shalati hotel. In the middle of Kruger National Park, South Africa's most celebrated game reserve, a luxury train takes passengers, but never moves. At the Kruger Shalati (right) - known as the Train on the Bridge - guests gaze over the animals kingdom, from the golden sunrise until the Milky Way spills across the nighttime sky. Train carriages have been converted into dining spaces (above) and rooms (left), and there is even a small outdoor pool. In the 1920s, this railway line was the only way into Kruger. But the last locomotive came through in 1979, and the railway fell into disuse. The hotel won a tender in 2016 to transform it into posh accommodation, with a train that never moves, but always has bird's-eye views.
A view of the Kruger National Park (above) from a room at the Kruger Shalati hotel. 	In the middle of Kruger National Park, South Africa's most celebrated game reserve, a luxury train takes passengers, but never moves. At the Kruger Shalati (right) -
A view of the Kruger National Park (above) from a room at the Kruger Shalati hotel. In the middle of Kruger National Park, South Africa's most celebrated game reserve, a luxury train takes passengers, but never moves. At the Kruger Shalati (right) - known as the Train on the Bridge - guests gaze over the animals kingdom, from the golden sunrise until the Milky Way spills across the nighttime sky. Train carriages have been converted into dining spaces (above) and rooms (left), and there is even a small outdoor pool. In the 1920s, this railway line was the only way into Kruger. But the last locomotive came through in 1979, and the railway fell into disuse. The hotel won a tender in 2016 to transform it into posh accommodation, with a train that never moves, but always has bird's-eye views.
A view of the Kruger National Park (above) from a room at the Kruger Shalati hotel. 	In the middle of Kruger National Park, South Africa's most celebrated game reserve, a luxury train takes passengers, but never moves. At the Kruger Shalati (right) -
A view of the Kruger National Park (above) from a room at the Kruger Shalati hotel. In the middle of Kruger National Park, South Africa's most celebrated game reserve, a luxury train takes passengers, but never moves. At the Kruger Shalati (right) - known as the Train on the Bridge - guests gaze over the animals kingdom, from the golden sunrise until the Milky Way spills across the nighttime sky. Train carriages have been converted into dining spaces (above) and rooms (left), and there is even a small outdoor pool. In the 1920s, this railway line was the only way into Kruger. But the last locomotive came through in 1979, and the railway fell into disuse. The hotel won a tender in 2016 to transform it into posh accommodation, with a train that never moves, but always has bird's-eye views.
A view of the Kruger National Park (above) from a room at the Kruger Shalati hotel. 	In the middle of Kruger National Park, South Africa's most celebrated game reserve, a luxury train takes passengers, but never moves. At the Kruger Shalati (right) -
A view of the Kruger National Park (above) from a room at the Kruger Shalati hotel. In the middle of Kruger National Park, South Africa's most celebrated game reserve, a luxury train takes passengers, but never moves. At the Kruger Shalati (right) - known as the Train on the Bridge - guests gaze over the animals kingdom, from the golden sunrise until the Milky Way spills across the nighttime sky. Train carriages have been converted into dining spaces (above) and rooms (left), and there is even a small outdoor pool. In the 1920s, this railway line was the only way into Kruger. But the last locomotive came through in 1979, and the railway fell into disuse. The hotel won a tender in 2016 to transform it into posh accommodation, with a train that never moves, but always has bird's-eye views.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on May 15, 2022, with the headline TRAIN TO NOWHERE. Subscribe