The Chic Home: Light, bright and airy apartment for a family of four

The floor plan centred on the family's needs, lifestyle and preferences. PHOTO: ALAN LEE (K STUDIO) WITH ART DIRECTION BY KRISTY QUAH
The differences in the levels between the entrance foyer and the living area create a natural threshold. PHOTOS: ALAN LEE (K STUDIO) WITH ART DIRECTION BY KRISTY QUAH
The semi-open kitchen with an island is just what the family need. PHOTO: ALAN LEE (K STUDIO) WITH ART DIRECTION BY KRISTY QUAH
Previously a balcony, the dining nook features banquette-style seating. PHOTO: ALAN LEE (K STUDIO) WITH ART DIRECTION BY KRISTY QUAH
The study nook in the master bedroom used to be a balcony. PHOTO: ALAN LEE (K STUDIO) WITH ART DIRECTION BY KRISTY QUAH

SINGAPORE - Despite being more than 50 years old, the three-room, 1,800 sq ft condominium apartment at Cavenagh Court was in good shape.

However, as the design was dated, extensive changes had to meet the needs of Mr Terry Ong, his wife Eugenia Tan and their two young children, who wanted a home where they could spend time together as a family.

Mr Ong, 34, a business director and an avid cook who wanted a kitchen island, says: "No matter how much we work separately, we are still a team. Plus, with young children, safety is always paramount."

Ms Tan, 36, a speech therapist, adds: "We also wanted a walk-in wardrobe."

The floor plan - the work of Singapore-based design practice Studio Super Safari's architect and principal designer Liew Kok Fong - centred on the family's needs, lifestyle and preferences.

Removing the old kitchen walls transformed it into an open-concept space. Pocket sliding glass panels keep cooking fumes and grease in the kitchen - and the kids out of it - when Mr Ong cooks. The wall separating the kitchen and yard was also demolished. That space is now part of the kitchen.

"Combining the two optimises the space and provides Mr Ong with the kitchen island he desired," Mr Liew says.

The living and dining area's balcony is now a dining nook with a custom-built dining table and banquette-style seating. It is one of the family's favourite spots.

Ms Tan says: "There is so much natural light. We spend a lot of time eating, playing and working here."

This freed up more space for the living area, where the couple worked with furnishings brand Aratamete to customise the rugs and covers to match their preferred colour scheme. Soft furnishings pop against a neutral grey and muted colour background.

By reconfiguring the existing bedrooms and corridors, there was enough space in the master bedroom to accommodate a walk-in wardrobe consisting of two rows that run along the former corridor leading to the bedrooms.

The remaining two bedrooms were previously accessible separately from the corridor. There is now an interconnected bedroom for the children and a playroom that opens to the living room. As the built-in furniture is set along the periphery, there is plenty of space for the children to play. Then, when they require separate bedrooms, the playroom can become a bedroom.

The family moved into their new home in November 2020 after a 41/2-month renovation costing about $200,000, including furniture.

A pastel palette creates a soothing and calming ambience in the children’s bedroom. PHOTO: ALAN LEE (K STUDIO) WITH ART DIRECTION BY KRISTY QUAH

"Most of the furniture was built into the house, so we didn't need too many loose items. Also, as a family with two small children, the interconnected rooms and shared spaces are a big plus for us," says Mr Ong.

  • This article first appeared in the February 2022 issue of Home & Decor, which is published by SPH Magazines. Get the April and latest issue of Home & Decor now at all newsstands or download the digital edition of Home & Decor from the App Store, Magzter or Google Play. Also, see more inspiring homes at the Home & Decor website.

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