Reclaiming Matrix from 'red pill': Lauren Groff writes about mediaeval nuns

In her new novel Matrix, Lauren Groff imagines the life of Marie de France, a 12th-century poet and pictures her as the radical prioress of an English abbey. PHOTOS: HUTCHINSON HEINEMANN, ELI SINKUS
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SINGAPORE - Amid the hue and cry of Mr Donald Trump's presidency of the United States, Lauren Groff decided to retreat into a feminist utopia. Specifically, a mediaeval nunnery.

In her new novel Matrix, the American author imagines the life of Marie de France, an obscure 12th-century poet known for her Breton lais - short narrative poems - and pictures her as the radical prioress of an English abbey.

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