No shame to recognise rules on PMDs are not working

A man riding a personal mobility device on the pavement along Holland Road, on March 6, 2018.
A man riding a personal mobility device on the pavement along Holland Road, on March 6, 2018.PHOTO: ST FILE

Mr Clemente Escano is correct in saying that it is not right to allow bicycles and motorised devices on pedestrian paths (Shared paths a recipe for accidents; June 7).

It is also wrong for the relevant authorities to say that the culprits are in the minority.

Based on the frequent reports on social media and the various mainstream papers, nearly all the accidents involving bicycles and motorised devices were fatal.

This new normal, riding on pathways, has deprived pedestrians of our safety and the peace we used to enjoy while walking.

We now have to be on a constant lookout for personal mobility devices (PMDs), which seem to pop up from out of nowhere.

The authorities do not seem to recognise the severity of the situation.

It is very clear, from all the reports and feedback by citizens, that these PMDs cannot share the paths with pedestrians.

It is no shame to recognise that the methods used to date is not working, but it will be unforgivable if the relevant authorities allow the situation to continue and endanger the lives of many.

Lim Tong Wah