SGInnovate to partner NUS centre to promote quantum technology in Singapore

Steve Leonard (left), founding CEO of SGInnovate, and Artur Ekert, founding Director, Centre for Quantum Technologies, signed a Memorandum of Intent to promote quantum technologies and facilitate the commercialisation of quantum innovations in Singap
Steve Leonard (left), founding CEO of SGInnovate, and Artur Ekert, founding Director, Centre for Quantum Technologies, signed a Memorandum of Intent to promote quantum technologies and facilitate the commercialisation of quantum innovations in Singapore on June 7, 2019. PHOTO: SGINNOVATE

SINGAPORE - Tech company SGInnovate is partnering a unit at the National University of Singapore (NUS) to promote quantum technology here.

The initiative will involve supporting researchers in the field and helping them take their quantum-based innovations to market, including assistance in fund-raising.

SGInnovate is a private-limited company wholly owned by the government that aims to support entrepreneurs in what is called the deep tech sector.

Quantum science uses the quantum properties of particles - the ways the components of matter and light behave and interact with each other - to perform operations that are more precise, fast or efficient than can be achieved by other means.

Quantum applications can be seen in clocks that can keep precise time using the specific frequencies of individual atoms, technology that is essential to global positioning systems (GPS), for instance.

SGInnovate recently invested in three quantum technology start-ups. One uses a form of quantum technology to build systems for navigation and exploration. The technology enables the systems to work reliably and accurately everywhere, including underwater or underground.

Its new partnership with the Centre for Quantum Technologies at NUS will last for two years, as outlined in a memorandum of intent signed on Friday (June 7).

It will assist local researchers working in the quantum technology field to commercialise their research into industry solutions that can be scaled up.

SGInnovate founding chief executive Steve Leonard said: "We want to help entrepreneurial scientists working with quantum technologies to build commercially successful start-ups.

"We also target to reach over 2,000 individuals in the wider deep tech community with various outreach activities, so more people can learn about and understand the possibilities of quantum technologies."

 

Professor Artur Ekert, founding director of the Centre for Quantum Technologies, added: "Together, we aim to catalyse the translation of our scientific advances into technologies that will benefit the economy and society."

The centre will introduce researchers who are interested in exploring start-ups to SGInnovate.

SGInnovate will provide coaching and support so they can launch and expand their start-ups.

Its support could also include raising investment funds from venture capital firms.

SGInnovate, with support from the centre, will also host frequent quantum-focused workshops, thought leadership and community events. This will help to build up a strong and entrepreneurial quantum ecosystem in Singapore.