Non-profit group feeds hungry and is fodder for MBA minds

Volunteers from the Robin Hood Army serving food to poor children in Bangalore (above) and to the homeless in the Philippines (below). The Indian non-profit has a zero-funds approach and is volunteer-driven. PHOTOS: ROBIN HOOD ARMY
Volunteers from the Robin Hood Army serving food to poor children in Bangalore and to the homeless in the Philippines (above). The Indian non-profit has a zero-funds approach and is volunteer-driven. PHOTO: ROBIN HOOD ARMY

Organisation in India which collects food for the needy studied at Harvard for its approach

An Indian non-profit group that collects excess food from restaurants to feed the hungry will now be studied by MBA students at Harvard Business School.

Called the Robin Hood Army, the outfit's zero-funds approach and entirely volunteer-driven work in 13 countries is seen as an "effective teaching tool" for entrepreneurship, scaling, decentralised management and employee motivation.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 28, 2020, with the headline 'Non-profit group feeds hungry and is fodder for MBA minds'. Print Edition | Subscribe