'Black trousers only for Johor royals': Malaysian minister gets reprimand for attire at Hari Raya celebrations

Agriculture and Agro-based Industry Minister Datuk Salahuddin Ayub (pictured, in 2017), received a letter from the Johor Council of the Royal Court over the state's dress code.
Agriculture and Agro-based Industry Minister Datuk Salahuddin Ayub (pictured, in 2017), received a letter from the Johor Council of the Royal Court over the state's dress code. PHOTO: BERITA HARIAN

SUNGAI BULOH (THE STAR/ASIA NEWS NETWORK) - Agriculture and Agro-based Industry Minister Salahuddin Ayub confirmed he received a letter from the Johor Council of the Royal Court over the state's dress code after a photograph of him wearing baju Melayu with black trousers during Hari Raya Aidilfitri celebrations was spread on social media.

Johor Crown Prince Tunku Ismail Ibni Sultan Ibrahim had shared photos on his Instagram showing Datuk Salahuddin in black pants, alongside Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad, Parti Keadilan Rakyat president Anwar Ibrahim and Federal Territories Minister Khalid Abdul Samad.

Tunku Ismail also shared a picture of his father Sultan Ibrahim Ibni Almarhum Sultan Iskandar, himself and his siblings dressed in black pants.

In the post, which was only available for 24 hours, Tunku Ismail said the teluk belanga baju Melayu paired with black pants is the traditional attire of Johor royalty. 

"Because only the royal family can - or is worthy to - wear black pants. 

"Many outsiders and certain individuals do not like or criticise the Johor royal family, but want to imitate the Johor royal style," he wrote.

It was reported that Mr Salahuddin received the letter dated June 9 on June 20. Attached to the letter was a copy of the state's garment regulations.

"Yes, I would like wish thank you over the letter and I accept it," the minister told reporters at a function here.

The letter was signed by council president Abdul Rahim Ramli.

"The council hopes that Datuk (Salahuddin), as a Johor native, takes note of the regulations and preserves and upholds the culture of Johor," read the letter.

The teluk belanga style features a round neckline with a slit in the middle connected by a single detachable button known as sebuku garam, usually made from semi-precious or precious stones.

"Don't forget that eagles and pipit (sparrows) fly at different heights," Tunku Ismail's post added.