3 Singaporeans among cosplayers detained in Malaysia

The event organiser and 11 foreign participants were detained during a raid on Cosplay Festival 4, which was held at Sunway Putra Hotel in Malaysia.
The event organiser and 11 foreign participants were detained during a raid on Cosplay Festival 4, which was held at Sunway Putra Hotel in Malaysia.PHOTOS: CHINA PRESS

SINGAPORE (THE NEW PAPER) - Three Singaporeans who were part of a cosplay festival in Kuala Lumpur at the weekend have been detained by Malaysian authorities for allegedly violating the conditions of their social visit passes.

Malaysian media reported that the country's immigration authority - Jabatan Imigresen Malaysia (JIM) - conducted a raid on Cosplay Festival 4, a two-day event at Sunway Putra Hotel, at about 2pm on Saturday (March 23).

JIM Kuala Lumpur director Hamidi Adam told media that 12 people were detained, including the event organiser Ahmad Syafiq Nizar Ahmad Radzi, a 27-year-old Malaysian.

The other 11 are foreign participants comprising three Singaporeans, two Thai nationals, one person from Hong Kong and five Japanese, one of whom is a resident of Malaysia who was also selling merchandise at the event, according to Japanese news portal SoraNews24.

Mr Hamidi said a total of 52 participants were checked, and investigations revealed that the foreigners detained entered Malaysia on social visit passes a few days before the event.

The cosplay festival was held without permission from Malaysia's Central Agency for Filming and Performance by Foreign Artistes, or Puspal, he said.

According to JIM's website, professional visit passes are issued to foreign stage artists who wish to perform in Malaysia, and applications should be forwarded to Puspal for approval.

Cosplay Festival 4's Facebook event page had promised stage performances and booths with fan-made products.

When asked, Mr Syafiq, the events director of Cosplay Corner, which organised Cosplay Festival 4, did not directly address questions about whether he sought prior permission from Puspal, but said those detained were not paid to perform or to work for the event.

Speaking to The New Paper over the phone on Tuesday (March 26), he said the cosplayers paid for their own transport and accommodation, adding that the only performers who were paid were Malaysians.

Mr Syafiq, who was released from custody on Sunday, said: "These people are just hobbyists... They are also friends of mine. That is why they were willing to come."

Mr Syafiq said the 11 foreigners are being held at the immigration department's lock-up in Jalan Duta and he is taking responsibility for what happened.

He has already informed their respective embassies and parents, who are being given daily updates.

He said he has also hired a lawyer for 10 of the 11 detainees who did not have their own legal representation.

Forced to cancel the second day of the festival, Mr Syafiq added that he will be contacting sponsors and booth tenants in due course and hopes to refund at least half of the money they paid by end-April.

He is still deciding how to refund those who bought tickets for the second day's events.

On Wednesday (March 27), a Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesman told TNP that it is aware of the incident and the Singapore High Commission in Malaysia is rendering consular assistance to the Singaporeans.