Malaysian cops to question rights activist Ambiga Sreenevasan Friday over alleged 'threat' of street rallies

Datuk Ambiga Sreenevasan rousing the crowd at at the Bersih 3.0 rally on April 28, 2012.
Datuk Ambiga Sreenevasan rousing the crowd at at the Bersih 3.0 rally on April 28, 2012.PHOTO: MARK CHEONG

KUALA LUMPUR (THE STAR/ASIA NEWS NETWORK) - Malaysian rights campaigner and former Malaysian Bar Council president Datuk Ambiga Sreenevasan has been summoned for questioning by the police, after she was warned by the Malaysian police chief over an alleged "threat" she made of street rallies.

The Malaysian National Human Rights Society (Hakam) head told The Star that she was called by officers Thursday and instructed to turn herself in at the Dang Wangi police headquarters at 3pm Friday.

She said police were investigating her under Section 124 of the Penal Code for "intent to compel or restrain the exercise of any lawful power".

"I will show up and we will see how it goes," she said.

Police chief Tan Sri Khalid Abu Bakar warned against attempts to "threaten national security" following Tuesday's Cabinet reshuffle, singling out Ambiga, who was quoted in the media saying that the Government risked another street protest if it did not push for a new temporary administration. He asked her to deny that she had made the threat or risk arrest.

Ambiga had previously said the recent Cabinet reshuffle was only "compounding the crisis" over Prime Minister Najib Razak's handling of the 1Malaysia Development Berhad controversy. She also called on federal lawmakers to form a new temporary government and a bi-partisan Cabinet.