Malaysian convicted of murder is executed in Singapore

Micheal Garing, who was from Kapit, Sarawak, was convicted of murder by the Singapore High Court in 2015, and its Court of Appeal affirmed the conviction in 2017.
Micheal Garing, who was from Kapit, Sarawak, was convicted of murder by the Singapore High Court in 2015, and its Court of Appeal affirmed the conviction in 2017.PHOTO: ST FILE

PETALING JAYA (THE STAR/ASIA NEWS NETWORK) - A Malaysian convicted of murder in 2015 was executed at Singapore's Changi Prison on Friday (March 22) morning.

Micheal Garing, 30, who was from Kapit, Sarawak, had been convicted of murder by the Singapore High Court in 2015. His appeal was thrown out by the Republic's Court of Appeal in 2017.

Micheal and another Sarawakian, Tony Imba, were part of a gang that went on a robbery spree, severely injuring three victims and killing a fourth man in 2010.

The man they killed suffered a fractured skull, a severed left hand, a slash wound across his neck and a back wound so deep that his shoulder blade was cracked.

Tony was sentenced to life in prison for his role in the robbery.

The Malaysian government had said that it would submit a letter to Singapore to urge it to commute Micheal's death sentence.

Micheal's parents had also petitioned the Singapore Government for clemency.

On Micheal's appeal dismissed by the Court of Appeal in 2017, Singapore's Ministry of Home Affairs (MHA) said on Friday that the court, in its written judgment, said the death penalty was warranted for Micheal as he had attacked the victim using a parang in a "totally savage and merciless manner".

Micheal submitted a petition for clemency to the President, which was unsuccessful.

MHA said he was accorded full due process under the law, and was represented by legal counsel throughout the process.

"Our laws apply equally to all, regardless of whether the offender is local or foreign. All foreigners who visit or live in Singapore must abide by our laws. The death penalty is part of Singapore's criminal justice system and is only used against very serious crimes," the ministry said.

"The issue of capital punishment is a question that every State has the sovereign right to decide for itself, taking into account its own circumstances."