When Moon Jae In meets Kim Jong Un: What can be brought to the table?

A child writes a message on a unification flag, wishing for a successful inter-Korean summit during a rally in central Seoul, South Korea, on April 21, 2018.
A child writes a message on a unification flag, wishing for a successful inter-Korean summit during a rally in central Seoul, South Korea, on April 21, 2018.PHOTO: REUTERS
Pedestrians walking past a banner at Seoul City Hall showing two hands shaking to form the shape of the Korean Peninsula in the run-up to the inter-Korean summit.
Pedestrians walking past a banner at Seoul City Hall showing two hands shaking to form the shape of the Korean Peninsula in the run-up to the inter-Korean summit.PHOTO: AFP

On April 27 (Friday), North and South Korean leaders will have their first meeting since 2007 in the third inter-Korean summit to be held after the 1950-1953 Korean War. 

But Friday’s sit-down involves not just the two Koreas. It could also impact alliances shaped by the Cold War and upend the security landscape in East Asia - and across the globe. 

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