Matchfixing trial: Ding disputes forensic evidence that he had seven email accounts

Singaporean businessman Eric Ding Si Yang (right) arrives with his lawyer for a trial at the Subordinate courts in Singapore on Monday, Sept 2, 2013. One of seven phones seized from alleged matchfixer Ding came under scrutiny on Monday, as a for
Singaporean businessman Eric Ding Si Yang (right) arrives with his lawyer for a trial at the Subordinate courts in Singapore on Monday, Sept 2, 2013. One of seven phones seized from alleged matchfixer Ding came under scrutiny on Monday, as a forensics expert provided a breakdown of its contents. -- PHOTO: AFP

One of seven phones seized from alleged matchfixer Eric Ding Si Yang came under scrutiny on Monday, as a forensics expert provided a breakdown of its contents.

The black iPhone with a blue cover contained records of six Gmail accounts and one Yahoo e-mail account being accessed via their respective mobile apps, testified Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau special investigator Chng Tze Wei.

But the apps were not found in the phone - which was produced in court - prompting defence counsel Thong Chee Kun to say: "I am instructed that the user of the phone had no such specific apps at any time."

Mr Chng agreed that there were no such apps "from the logical view". "But from the forensic point of view, using forensic software, we can analyse applications that have been deleted," he added.

It also emerged that 69 SMSes, two phone book records, 54 call logs, 184 chat messages found in instant messaging app Line, and another 388 records in another instant messaging app OneTeam were retrieved from the phone, though a number of them had also been deleted.

Businessman Ding, 31, is accused of bribing three Fifa-accredited Lebanese officials with sexual favours from prostitutes to induce them into fixing a soccer match. If convicted, he can be fined up to $100,000, or jailed up to five years, or both.