Thursday, Jul 24, 2014Thursday, Jul 24, 2014
Opinion
 
Every international disaster produces its own stream of conspiracy theories. Some are silly but innocuous, such as stories that neither Elvis Presley nor Britain's Princess Diana ever died. Others are more dangerous and enduring, such as claims that the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the United States were perpetrated by the US government.

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OUR COLUMNISTS

Kishore Mahbubani

Tommy
Koh

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White

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Gungwu

Kavi Chong-kittavorn

David
Chan

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Cheng

John
Wong

Simon Chesterman

Sumiko
Tan

Salma
Khalik

John
Lui

Andy
Ho

Sandra
Davie

Ignatius
Low

Fiona
Chan

Christopher Tan

Robin
Chan

The Straits Times Editorial

The annual Primary 1 registration exercise can become a season of angst when the distribution of educational resources is complicated by a mismatch of supply and demand and by questions of equity.