Gwyneth Paltrow's website Goop forced to remove claims

Goop said the wellness stickers (above) are made with the carbon material Nasa uses to line spacesuits, but the space agency says it does not use carbon fibre in the suits.
Goop said the wellness stickers (above) are made with the carbon material Nasa uses to line spacesuits, but the space agency says it does not use carbon fibre in the suits.PHOTO: BODY VIBES/ INSTAGRAM
Gwyneth Paltrow.
Gwyneth Paltrow.

NEW YORK • American space agency Nasa has an unexpected mission - to deal with Gwyneth Paltrow's launch of wellness stickers on her lifestyle blog Goop.

Goop said in a post that the stickers, which are sold by Body Vibes, are "made with the same conductive carbon material Nasa uses to line space suits, so they can monitor an astronaut's vitals during wear" and can target energetic frequency imbalances in the body, according to the Gizmodo website.

"Human bodies operate at an ideal energetic frequency, but everyday stresses and anxiety can throw off our internal balance, depleting our energy reserves and weakening our immune systems," Goop said.

Body Vibes claims the stickers create a "calming effect" that alleviates "physical tension and anxiety".

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The company also says they help clear the skin.

The stickers are sold in packages of 10 for US$60 (S$83) or 24 for US$120.

But, as Gizmodo first reported last week: "A representative from Nasa's spacewalk office told Gizmodo that they 'do not have any conductive carbon material lining the spacesuits'."

Spokesman Tabatha Thompson of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration told The Washington Post over the weekend that it does not use carbon fibre anywhere in the spacesuits that are made of synthetic polymers, spandex and other materials.

Goop has since removed the reference to Nasa materials from the product description on its website.

It said in a statement to The Post that the advice and recommendations posted on its website are not considered "formal endorsements".

"Our content is meant to highlight unique products and offerings, find open-minded alternatives and encourage conversation.

"Based on the statement from Nasa, we've gone back to the company to inquire about the claim and removed the claim from our site until we get additional verification."

The lifestyle and wellness website has been challenged by doctors for claiming, for instance, that tight bras can cause breast cancer and that latex condoms contain a carcinogen.

Goop recently launched its first wellness summit, In Goop Health, where model Miranda Kerr discussed using leeches in her beauty routine, among other presentations.

WASHINGTON POST

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 26, 2017, with the headline 'Gwyneth Paltrow's website Goop forced to remove claims'. Print Edition | Subscribe