Tennis: Dizzy Bouchard and Tsonga exit China Open in first round

Eugenie Bouchard of Canada cries into her towel after she withdrew from her match against Andrea Petkovic of Germany at the China Open on Oct 5, 2015.
Eugenie Bouchard of Canada cries into her towel after she withdrew from her match against Andrea Petkovic of Germany at the China Open on Oct 5, 2015. PHOTO: EPA

BEIJING (AFP) - Eugenie Bouchard's concussion nightmare extended into the China Open on Monday as she felt faint and tearfully retired in the first round - shortly after Jo-Wilfried Tsonga was also struck by dizzy spells.

Bouchard has not played since she slammed her head in a locker-room fall at the US Open, and she lasted just 10 games against Andrea Petkovic before feeling dizzy and having her blood pressure checked.

The Canadian sobbed into her towel and was comforted by Petkovic before she rose and walked out, waving grimly to the Beijing crowd, with the scoreline standing 6-2, 1-1 to her opponent.

"I just asked her what happened, and she told me that she felt very dizzy. Then I asked if it was the same, if it still was the concussion," Petkovic said. "She said, yeah, it tends to come back when she gets physically very active. I just said I feel it's really bad luck because I thought she was playing so well again."

Earlier Tsonga refused to blame Beijing's notorious air pollution as he was also hit by dizzy spells before falling at the first hurdle 7-6 (7-4), 6-2 to little-known Austrian Andreas Haider-Maurer.

Tsonga was down in the second set when he staggered on court and took a time-out, during which he had his heartbeat checked with a stethoscope and was given medication.

But it was not long before the out-of-sorts Tsonga limply succumbed to Haider-Maurer, who at world no. 64 becomes the lowest ranked player to beat the Frenchman this season.