Samsung Note7 phone set car on fire, says Florida man; airlines ban charging of phone on flights

Mr Nathan Dornacher said his jeep was set on fire after the Samsung Galaxy Note7 that was left charging in the vehicle ignited on Sept 5, 2016.
Mr Nathan Dornacher said his jeep was set on fire after the Samsung Galaxy Note7 that was left charging in the vehicle ignited on Sept 5, 2016. PHOTO: FACEBOOK/NATHAN LYDIA DORNACHER
The charred remains of the jeep's dashboard after it caught fire.
The charred remains of the jeep's dashboard after it caught fire.SCREENGRAB: ABC NEWS

A Samsung Galaxy Note7 mobile phone ignited while it was charging and set his jeep on fire, a US man has claimed.

Mr Nathan Dornacher, a Florida resident, said in a Facebook post that he and his family were unloading a desk they had bought from the car. They left the car running as they were going to head out again and the phone was charging in the car.

When they returned to the vehicle, it was in flames.

"Not the barbecue I wanted on my day off," he wrote.

He said he was going to the car to grab his phone and saw flames inside. He could not find a fire extinguisher, and yelled at his wife to call the Fire Department, he said.

Fire officials and Samsung have launched investigations into the fire which happened on Monday (Sept 5), ABC News reported.

Samsung issued a global recall of the newly launched flagship phone on Sept 2 due to problems with the batteries.

The company said then that there had been 35 incidents involving the model's batteries. Customers posted photos and videos of charred phones they said had burst into flames.

 
 

On Tuesday, an Australian man recounted on Reddit how the phone exploded in his hotel room while he was asleep and nearly set the room on fire.

Airlines have now issued warnings about the phones, Reuters said.

Singapore Airlines on Friday became the latest carrier to ban use of the phones during flights, following an identical move by three Australian airlines.

Australia's Qantas Airways Ltd, Jetstar Airways and Virgin Australia Holdings Ltd also announced they had banned passengers from using or charging the phones.

Singapore Airlines said in a statement: "The powering up and charging of Samsung Galaxy Note7 mobile phones is prohibited on all our flights."

Airline passengers should not turn on or charge their Samsung Galaxy Note7 smartphones during flights or stow them in checked baggage due to concerns over the phone's fire-prone batteries, the US Federal Aviation Administration said.

Although customers will still be able to bring the phones on flights, the bans extend to the phones being plugged into flight entertainment systems where USB ports are available.

The International Air Transportation Association said airlines have conducted risk assessments and noted that other phones have been recalled for battery issues.

"Although Samsung is the most recent company advising of faulty devices, others have issued similar recalls and warnings regarding lithium batteries in laptops over the last 12 months, so the industry is familiar with and equipped to manage such situations," the IATA said.