Football: Ex-Arsenal goalkeeper Jens Lehmann says Bayern Munich dominance not killing Bundesliga

Former Arsenal goalkeeper Jens Lehmann (middle) posing for a picture with fans in Singapore. He is in Singapore to promote the German Bundesliga.
Former Arsenal goalkeeper Jens Lehmann (middle) posing for a picture with fans in Singapore. He is in Singapore to promote the German Bundesliga.PHOTO: FOOTVOLLEY SINGAPORE/FACEBOOK

SINGAPORE - Even though they have won the Bundesliga title for four straight years, former Arsenal and Germany goalkeeper Jens Lehmann does not think Bayern Munich's dominance will kill its popularity with fans.

Last season, they won the league by 10 points. Two year before, under former coach Pep Guardiola, they sewed up the title with a record seven games remaining.

Over the years they also snapped up many of their rivals' top players, including Robert Lewandowski, Mario Goetze and Mats Hummels.

But Lehmann, who has played for Schalke, Borussia Dortmund and Stuttgart, said the German league remains competitive and is in fact, better in quality than the English Premier League.

Speaking at the Bundesliga's Singapore office in Duxton Hill, the 46-year-old said: "When I was playing (in England) I could honestly say it was the fastest league by far. The tempo is so high. But what I found out, in the last years when you look at the Premier League and you watch the games closely, the pace has dropped.

"It's not that fast anymore. And that was a surprise for me because over the last two to three years, a good game in the Bundesliga is faster than the Premier League. It shows you that the clubs in Bundesliga has done a better job so far - with less money. So it's all about being patient and (spreading the) knowledge (that Bundesliga is superior)."

He also pointed to the UEFA coefficient rankings for club competitions. The Bundesliga ranked higher than English Premier League. They are second, one spot ahead of the EPL.

Lehmann, who has one EPL title and one FA Cup to his name, expressed confidence that German football is on the right track, especially with its clubs not spending money wildly like their English counterparts.

Taking a snipe at his former club, Lehmann, a member of the Invincibles Gunners squad that went unbeaten for a whole season, said: "Look at (Shkodran) Mustafi. He cost £30 million but he is not a leader and thinker on the pitch."